Link

27 March 2017

Unspeakable Realities Block Universal Health Coverage In America

“My family’s generous health insurance costs about $20,000 a year, of which we pay only $4,000 in premiums. The rest is subsidized by taxpayers. You read that right. Like virtually everyone else on my block who isn’t old enough for Medicare or employed by the government, my family is covered by private health insurance subsidized by taxpayers at a stupendous public cost. Well over 90% of white households earning over the white median income (about $75,000) carried health insurance even before the Affordable Care Act. White socialism is nice if you can get it.”

If you live in the US and you don't know how employer provided benefits are also government provided (through tax subsidies) then you need to read this. Too many people are unaware of how much our government already subsidizes our health insurance coverage and how that system is just reserved for those with good jobs. I went on a little Twitter rampage about this last week and this article explains it well. I'm not sure I agree with why certain groups of people voted the way they did last November, but I completely agree that most people don't get how this system works and how utterly awful it is.

Link

27 March 2017

The Problem With Facts

“But the facts need a champion. Facts rarely stand up for themselves — they need someone to make us care about them, to make us curious. That’s what Rosling did. And faced with the apocalyptic possibility of a world where the facts don’t matter, that is the example we must follow.”

This is a long, but really interesting article regarding fact checking, trying to report the truth, and how people deal with facts. Along the way you get a glimpse into the fascinating history of how the tobacco companies fooled the public for years while knowing their products were dangerous and horrible. I really like the idea of using curiosity to get people to find the truth and the idea of truth champions who are able to do this for social sciences and politics just as has been done for other areas of study.

Link

27 March 2017

Planting iris

Austin’s blog continues to point out stories of interest and things to think about, along with helping me to see that I don’t need to know everything that’s going on in this crazy world right now.

Link

27 March 2017

The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death

“At the root of this is the American obsession with self-reliance, which makes it more acceptable to applaud an individual for working himself to death than to argue that an individual working himself to death is evidence of a flawed economic system. The contrast between the gig economy’s rhetoric (everyone is always connecting, having fun, and killing it!) and the conditions that allow it to exist (a lack of dependable employment that pays a living wage) makes this kink in our thinking especially clear.”

I'm not much of a fan of the gig economy or the sharing economy or whatever else you want to call it. I think it's a bunch of BS and is using nice talk to disguise how it's screwing everyone but those at the top. And this article shows how that spin works to the companies advantage but the workers disadvantage.

Reading

27 March 2017

Beware this boy

I really enjoyed the first book; the pacing and story were well done. But this second one is a bit of a mess.

Notes

22 March 2017

Yoga app

I'm an avid yoga person. I really love it.

Link

22 March 2017

Writing on the web

“I know not everybody wants to write on the web, and that’s fine. But it makes me sad when people choose not to publish their thoughts because they think no-one will be interested, or that it’s all been said before. I understand where those worries come from, but I believe—no, I know—that they are unfounded.”

Jeremy's dead on with this sentiment. I haven't written many longer pieces lately, but there are things brewing and I do a lot of drafts as I think through things. And I do write other places, mainly my work blog, but this is my home on the web, even if I'm not always writing longer form pieces but am talking about books and links for a long while.

Link

22 March 2017

What if All I Want is A Mediocre Life?

“Accept that all I really want is a small, slow, simple life. A mediocre life. A beautiful, quiet, gentle life. I think it is enough.”

A friend sent me this link with the words "thought you might like this" and she's right, I do like it. I like it a lot. I live a very slow and unplanned life. Most weekend we have zero plans and we love it. I love time to putter, ponder, listening to myself to see what it is I want to do with my free time.